Center for Allergy and Asthma of Georgia

Common Georgia Summer Allergy Triggers

Common Georgia Summer Allergy Triggers

4 Top Common Georgia Summer Allergens

With spring weather long behind us, hot, humid Georgia summer weather is here to stay. And with a new season comes a new set of allergens to be mindful of. Keep reading to learn more about the most common sources of summer allergy flare-ups, and how our team of board-certified specialists can help:

Grass Pollen

June is the most common month for grass allergy flare-ups. As the days get longer and the temperatures get hotter here in Georgia, grass pollen is also budding — which can be a problem if you tend to spend more time outside.

However, the temperature, the amount of rainfall, and even the time of day will affect grass pollen levels. This means planning accordingly and preparing yourself if you’re headed outdoors.

Ragweed

From late summer to early fall, ragweed is the most common cause of allergy symptoms for Georgians. The pollen grains from ragweed are lightweight and can spread easily on windy days. Similar to grass pollen, it's important to avoid contact with ragweed when outdoors, ensuring that you change your clothes once you return home.

Mold Spores

Georgia's hot, humid summer weather is the perfect time for fungus spores — especially mold spores. The best way to keep away from these allergens is to run air conditioning with a HEPA filter indoors to prevent spores from spreading throughout your house.

Seasonal Fruit

Patients with seasonal allergies can also have oral allergy syndrome, known as OAS. You may experience tingling or itching of the tongue, lips, and mouth when they eat certain raw foods.

Foods in the same botanical family can cause reactions, such as the ragweed family (bananas, melons, etc) and the grass family (peaches, tomatoes, oranges, etc.)

Find Relief for Your Summer Allergies

Our board-certified specialists at Center for Center for Allergy and Asthma of Georgia recommend allergy drops for patients who are allergic to outdoor allergens like grass, ragweed, and tree pollen. Also known as sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), allergy drops come in either a tablet or liquid form and are taken orally.

If you are suffering from summer allergies, let our allergy team at the Center for Allergy and Asthma of Georgia

help you find immediate and lasting relief.

Call now for same-day relief: (770) 285-5200